Category Archives: Environmental Issues and Disaster Management

Basic Concepts

  • How do Human Activities Contribute to Climate Change and How do They Compare with Natural Influences?

How do Human Activities Contribute to Climate Change and How do They Compare with Natural Influences? FAQHow do Human Activities Contribute to Climate Change and How do They Compare with Natural Influences? Frequently Asked Question 2.1

Human activities contribute to climate change by causing changes in Earth’s atmosphere in the amounts of greenhouse gases, aerosols (small particles), and cloudiness. The largest known contribution comes from the burning of fossil fuels, which releases carbon dioxide gas to the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases and aerosols affect climate by altering incoming solar radiation and outgoing infrared (thermal) radiation that are part of Earth’s energy balance. Changing the atmospheric abundance or properties of these gases and particles can lead to a warming or cooling of the climate system. Since the start of the industrial era (about 1750), the overall effect of human activities on climate has been a warming influence. The human impact on climate during this era greatly exceeds that due to known changes in natural processes, such as solar changes and volcanic eruptions.

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How do Human Activities Contribute to Climate Change and How do They Compare with Natural Influences?

  • A blanket around the earth_ Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A blanket around the earth

A layer of greenhouse gases – primarily water vapor, and including much smaller amounts of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide – acts as a thermal blanket for the Earth, absorbing heat and warming the surface to a life-supporting average of 59 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees Celsius).

 

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A blanket around the earth

 

Editorial / Newspaper Article

Earthquake: A warning – The Daily Star

A magnitude­ 6.8 earthquake was felt across the country on September 1 8 evening, shaking buildings in the capital and elsewhere. Panic gripped common people. The US Geological Survey said on its website the quake was centered 64 km (40 miles) northwest of Gangtok, capital of northeastern state Sikkim and below 20 km of the surface.

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Earthquake: A warning – The Daily Star

Forecasting earthquake forces – The Daily Star

Stony Brook University researchers have devised a numerical model to help explain the linkage between earthquakes and the powerful forces that cause them, according to a research paper scheduled to be published in the journal Science on Feb. 1 7. Their findings hold implications for long­term forecasting of earthquakes.

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Forecasting earthquake forces – The Daily Star 

Fore shocks predict earthquakes! – The Daily Star

After a destructive earthquake, scientists sifting through the rumbles that preceded the big event often find fore shocks.

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Fore shocks predict earthquakes! – The Daily Star

Surviving the worst earthquake in living memoryReturning to Tokyo after nearly a year upon conclusion of my almost four years stint as Bangladesh Ambassador to Japan, in the last week of the wintry month of February, naturally made me feel very nostalgic.

The fateful day of March 1 1 broke at dawn with bright sunshine. It was a beautiful day with a clear blue sky and without any sign of bad weather, let alone a catastrophe.

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Surviving the worst earthquake in living memory

  • Bangladesh 6th ‘high-risk country – The Daily Star

A leading disaster watchdog has ranked Bangladesh as the world’s sixth “high disaster risk country” in terms of its exposure to typhoons, earthquake and tsunamis. he German-based United Nations University (UNU) Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS) in its ‘World Risk Report-2011′ said Bangladesh ranked second in its risk index in Asia after the Philippines.

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Bangladesh 6th ‘high-risk country – The Daily Star

  • Earthquake preparedness in Bangladesh – The Daily Sun

The devastation that has been wrought recently by the massive earthquake in Japan should come as a grim but timely reminder to the authorities that Bangladesh, too, is vulnerable to earthquakes. The country lies on a major geological fault line and has suffered seven significant tremors in the 20th century alone. Food and Disaster Management Minister Abdur Razzaque’s emphasis on the need to enhance regional cooperation among South Asian countries to effectively tackle the challenge that is likely to emerge in the aftermath of a quake should be interpreted as a justifiable and time­befitting call. His call for regional cooperation in this regard came when he was inaugurating a four­day ‘First Regional Earthquake Response Seminar’ in the city on Monday.

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Earthquake preparedness in Bangladesh – The Daily Sun

  • Earthquake preparedness limping –  Financial Express

In December last, a moderate earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale jolted parts of the country including the capital. The quake was felt in Dhaka, Chittagong, Cox’s Bazar, Bandarban, Khagrachhari, Rangamati, Sylhet, Comilla, Gazipur and Brahmanbaria. No damage or loss of life was recorded in the incident.

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Earthquake preparedness limping –  Financial Express

  • Looming earthquake risk: How prepared are we? – The Daily Sun

Bangladesh is among the 20 most vulnerable countries to earthquake. According to experts, 65% area of Bangladesh is under the threat of extreme earthquake as Bangladesh is situated between three plate boundaries. One of these boundary lines is connected to the foothill of the Himalayas and is marked as the most dangerous source for severe earthquake. One CDMP study identified several active faults within Bangladesh based on historical events and evidence from geological investigations. In addition, inside the country and in the surrounding areas, there are numerous geographic scratches which are also the sources of earthquake. Among the scratches the most dangerous one is Rakhain Scratch, which is within 300 km of Chittagong, and the Madhupur and Dauki faults are
about 90 and 230 miles away from Dhaka respectively. Due to the geographical orientation, Dhaka, Chittagong, Sylhet, Mymensing, Rangpur and north­eastern extended areas of Bangladesh are under constant threat of earthquake.

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Looming earthquake risk: How prepared are we? – The Daily Sun

Newspaper Reference

 

Trees on 420 acres washed away in a decade – The Daily Star

Trees on 420 acres of forest land near Kuakata sea beach have been totally washed away under the impact of tidal surges from the Bay during the last one decade, making the area highly vulnerable during natural disasters like cyclones, floods and tidal surges.

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Trees on 420 acres washed away in a decade – The Daily Star

Trees dying, nobody to look at
Over 200 die, 250 await death on 30km oftwo highways – The Daily Star

Valuable trees including shishu, mahogany, koroi, sheel koroi, and eucalyptus beside two highways in the district are dying amid lack of proper care by the authorities concerned. Social Forestry Nursery Training Centre (SFNTC) in Brahmanbaria is responsible for maintenance of the trees beside about 30 kilometres road from Ashuganj to Khatihata on Dhaka­Sylhet Highway and Khatihata to Kuti on Sylhet­Comilla Highway in the district but the officials hardly visit the spots, said locals.

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Trees dying, nobody to look at Over 200 die, 250 await death on 30 km of two highways – The Daily Star 

Tree looting threatens Kuakata ‘green belt’
Over 2,000 felled in last three months – The Daily Star

Random looting of trees from Gongamoti reserve forest near Kuakata sea beach in the district threatens the ‘green belt’ created by forest department to save the area from natural disasters like cyclone, flood and tidal surge in the coastal region.

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Tree looting threatens Kuakata ‘green belt’
Over 2,000 felled in last three months – The Daily Star 

Tree looting on as authorities turn blind eye – The Daily Star

Illegal tree felling goes on unabated in different areas of Lalmonirhat district, but the authorities are yet to take any legal action against the culprits.

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Tree looting on as authorities turn blind eye – The Daily Star 

Brick kilns amid agri lands damage paddy, other crops – The Daily Star

In Badarganj, toxic hot gas from UBL Bricks damaged paddy on 150 acres of land belonging to 80 farmers at Asmatpara village.

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Brick kilns amid agricultural lands damage paddy other crops – The Daily Star

Traffic jam polluting air – The Daily Star

Traffic congestion in the capital and smoke from brick kilns are the main reasons for air pollution in Dhaka city, according to the World Bank and the Bangladesh government.

The Ministry of Environment and Forests says that vehicles in Dhaka move 1 4kmph on an average, which is very slow and causes them to burn more fuel and contribute to air pollution. They say the average speed could come down to 4kmph by 2025 if things do not improve.

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Traffic jam polluting air – The Daily Star 

Sundarbans shrinking 50,000 hectares of forest lost in a decade to encroachment – The Daily Star

Encroachers have deforested nearly 50,000 hectares of the Sundarbans in the last decade, a study has found.

This means the world’s largest mangrove forest spreading over 6.01 lakh hectares area has lost 8.3 percent of its northern front between 2000 and 2010.

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 Sundarbans shrinking 50,000 hectares of forest lost in a decade to encroachment – The Daily Star 

Rising noise pollution falls on deaf ears – The Daily Star

Dhaka city remains exposed to serious sound pollution due to lax enforcement of the law.

The pollution is caused by construction work using brick crushers and mixing machines, use of heavy equipment in factories and loudspeakers in and around the capital. Needless honking by motorists also largely contributes to the pollution.

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Rising noise pollution falls on deaf ears – The Daily Star 

Govt goes ahead, greens worried Selection of builders by March – The Daily Star

The government is set to hire a consultant for the massive coal power plant in Rampal, close to the Sundarbans, despite environmentalists’ concern about the project’s site selection and its Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) report.

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Govt goes ahead, greens worried Selection of builders by March – The Daily Star

It’s not worth taking the risk – The Daily Star

The consultant was drawing a perfect picture. One could easily get swamped by the plan of how big vessels would offload coal at Akram Point off the Sundarbans, how dust would be controlled and how the community would soon prosper.

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It’s not worth taking the risk – The Daily Star

Noise pollution increasingly posing as health
hazard – The Daily Star

Noise pollution is increasingly posing as a serious health hazard to the urban population and must be curbed through awareness programmes among the masses, said speakers at a seminar yesterday.

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Noise pollution increasingly posing as health
hazard – The Daily Star

Jhum continues to denude hills offlora and fauna – The Daily Star

As in other years, the month of April sees large­scale burning of trees and shrubs on slopes of hills in Khagrachhari, Rangamati and Bandarban districts of Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) region, as many locals prepare for traditional jhum (slash­and­burn) cultivation.

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Jhum continues to denude hills of flora and fauna – The Daily Star 

Illegal brick kiln a nuisance for seven educational institutions – The Daily Star

A local BNP leader has built a brick kiln on an arable land, also within half a kilometre from seven educational institutions at Puratan Thakurgaon village under Thakurgaon Sadar upazila, defying law and ignoring protest from the local students, teachers and farmers.

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Illegal brick kiln a nuisance for seven educational  institutions – The Daily Star 

Brick kilns near reserve forest in Tangail – The Daily Star

Defying law, local influential people have set up brick kilns near the reserve forest at Baheratoil in Sakhipur upazila.As per law, brick kilns are not allowed in and around 3 kilometers of any reserve forest.

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Brick kilns near reserve forest in Tangail – The Daily Star 

Brick kiln gives short shrift to DoE – The Daily Star

A brick kiln at Aminpur village in Bera upazila of Pabna continues to flout environmental laws, causing serious pollution to environment as well as affecting agriculture.

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Brick kiln gives short shrift to DoE – The Daily Star

30,000 trees wiped out in seven days Greed of influentials, forest men leaves Teknaf beach barren – The Daily Star

At least 30,000 Jhau (tamarisk) trees have been felled by a section of local influential people in Teknaf beach of Cox’s Bazar in last seven days while the forest department remained a silent spectator of the mindless tree felling.

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30,000 trees wiped out in seven days Greed of influential, forest men leaves Teknaf beach barren – The Daily Star 

‘Cancel Rampal plant by Sept 23′ Oil, gas protection committee to start long march Tuesday – The Daily Star

National Committee on Protection of Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, Power and Ports on Saturday reiterated its demand for cancellation of the government decision to construct Rampal power plant in Sundarbans.

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Cancel Rampal plant by Sept 23′ Oil, gas protection committee to start long march Tuesday – The Daily Star 

2,000 jhau trees on beach cut down Forest officials silent – The Daily Star

Miscreants felled around 2,000 tamarisk trees in last three days at a grove near Inani beach in Ukhia upazila in a bid to grab valuable land. During a visit to Sonarpara beach yesterday, a number of locals were seen uprooting the remains of the felled trees from the grove.

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2,000 jhau trees on beach cut down Forest officials silent – The Daily Star 

Nat’l Sustainable Development Strategy ‘to be finalized soon’ –  Financial Express

The government is going to finalise the National Sustainable Development Strategy (NSDS) 2010­2021 to meet the challenges of economic, social and environmental sustainability of the country, reports UNB.
The National Economic Council (NEC) will sit today (Tuesday) at the NEC conference room in city’s Sher­e­Bangla Nagar area to consider this strategy, said a high official at the Planning Commission. Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina will preside over the meeting.

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Nat’l Sustainable Development Strategy ‘to be finalized soon’ –  Financial Express

Most don’t have DoE certificate – The Daily Star

Barisal Owners of most of the petrol pumps in Barisal city are running their businesses without obtaining certificates from the Department of Environment (DoE), according to sources at DoE in Barisal. As per rules, owners of the petrol pumps and refueling stations must take “no objection certificate” (NOC) from the department to do the business.

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Most don’t have DoE certificate – The Daily Star

Mass transit, clean tech brick kilns imperative Prothom Alo, World Vision Bangladesh discussion told – The Daily Star

Mass transportation systems and brick kilns based on clean technology are a must to improve Dhaka’s air quality, said noted speakers at a discussion in the capital yesterday. Over 600 traditional brick kilns located in the northern fringes of the capital are the biggest contributors to its air pollution, said Md Nasir Uddin, joint secretary to the Ministry of Environment and Forests.

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Mass transit, clean tech brick kilns imperative Prothom Alo, World Vision Bangladesh discussion told – The Daily Star

Efforts for environment-friendly developed stressed –  Financial Express

Concerted efforts of government and citizens has become indispensable for environment-friendly national development, speakers at a post-rally discussion said her Tuesday.

Stressing the need for freeing the environment from all sorts of pollutions they laid emphasis on creating more public awareness about protection and preservation of environment for ensuring survival of all living beings.

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Efforts for environment-friendly developed stressed –  Financial Express

Bangladesh termed most vulnerable – The Daily Star

Bangladesh is the world’s most vulnerable country to climate change­related risk factors, according to a new Asian Development Bank (ADB) report released yesterday.

“Asia and the Pacific have six of the world’s 1 0 countries most vulnerable to climate change. Bangladesh tops this list, followed by India (2nd), Nepal (4th), the Philippines (6th), Afghanistan (8th) and Myanmar (1 0th),” the report said.

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Bangladesh termed most vulnerable – The Daily Star

Awareness stressed for reducing environmental degradation – The Daily Star

Speakers at a seminar here Saturday stressed for social awareness to reduce degradation of the environment for ensuring a safer future for the planet.

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Awareness stressed for reducing environmental degradation – The Daily Star

‘Afforestation can help address environmental degradation’ – The Daily Sun

Large scale afforestation can help minimise adverse impacts on climate by consuming industrially emitted carbon, speakers said at a daylong workshop here on Saturday.

They said Bangladesh is vulnerable natural disasters due to environmental degradation and immediate steps are necessary to address the problem.

The Zoology Department of Rajshahi University hosted the workshop titled “Effectiveness of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD)+ in delivering biodiversity cobenefits lessons from pilot projects in developing countries” at its seminar hall. DFID supported the workshop.

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‘Afforestation can help address environmental degradation’ – The Daily Sun

 

 

 

Editorial or Newspaper Article

Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

 Since the beginning of the last century, fossil fuel power plants have drastically diminished the quality of the air we breathe by venting most of the undesirable contaminants into the atmosphere. Despite regulatory and technical progress in pollution control, the degradation of air quality still continues, albeit at a reduced rate. But how many of us are aware that power plants also pollute rivers, lakes, and oceans? Unfortunately, we hardly mention this kind of water pollution when discussing the general issue of pollution.

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Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

Thermal pollution of water by power plants
Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

The word “riparian” is derived from the Latin word ‘Ripa’ (river bank). Vegetations bordering water bodies are technically known as riparian vegetation. These vegetations are also called riverine or gallery vegetations as they are grown adjacent to or near rivers. Plant habitats and communities along the river margins and banks
are called riparian vegetation, characterized by hydrophilic plants. Riparian vegetations form the transition between the aquatic and the terrestrial ecosystem. A riparian zone or riparian area is the interface between land and water body. Riparian is also the proper nomenclature for one of the fifteen terrestrial biomes of the earth. They occur in many forms including grassland, woodland, wetland or even non­ vegetative.

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Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

 Riparian Vegetation
Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

THE World Heritage Convention has the responsibility of protecting outstanding natural and cultural areas that form a part of the heritage of all mankind. Bangladesh became a party to the Convention in 1983. The Convention ruled favourably on the nomination of a part of the Sundarbans as a World Heritage Site.

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Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

 Threat to ecology of Sundarbans
Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

The use of polythene bags is increasing in Dhaka and elsewhere, despite the government’s ban on the environmentally hazardous item, as most people and businesses have started to use it extensively again.
Even though the ban came in January 2002, the government could hardly find a competitive alternative for the people as well as the environment over the years.

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Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

 Polythene Pollution

Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

The proposed 1,320 MW Rampal Power Plant is an outcome of prime minister of Bangladesh Sheikh Hasina’s visit to India from 10­12 January 2010. As per article 35 of the 51 point joint communiqué issued from that visit, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed on February 20, 2010 between Indian Energy Secretaries of India and Bangladesh H S Brahma and Abul Kalam Azad in Dhaka. As per that MoU, India’s National Thermal Power Company (NTPC) and Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) was to set up the Bagerhat Coal Based power plant at Rampal jointly.

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Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

 Rampal Powerplant
Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

On the 20th of December, 201 0 an oil spill was detected in the Bay off Sitakunda in Chittagong. It was over 3 kilometers long and 300­400 feet wide with a reddish­ black layer. It is suspected that, the cause of the oil spill was the unauthorised transfer or intentional dump of oil into the sea to salvage the grounded Indian flag carrier Ocean Pearl. It was a huge spill but still it is unknown how much oil they actually released into the sea. We have yet to know to what extent the area was affected. The DoE has served a notice to Sygma Shipping Line,
the parent company of Ocean Pearl, to answer why the company would not be prosecuted for causing oil spill in the Bay. But we have yet to know what necessary action has been taken. So far we only know that the port authority has not taken any legal action against the Ocean Pearl.

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Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

 Oil spilling in Sundarban_1
Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

The year 201 0 was a momentous one in the history for international collaborative efforts in environmental governance. Under the landmark agreement of the Montreal Protocol countries around the world, in collaboration with industry, have individually and collectively succeeded in eliminating the production and consumption of the most severely damaging ozone depleting substances (ODSs), viz, CFCs, CTC and Halons. As many of these ODSs are powerful green house gases (GHGs) this achievement has also had a substantial contribution in mitigating climate change.

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Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

 green cooling
Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

In the lexicon of sustainable development there is an established concept of intergenerational justice and a chain of obligation. Simply put the choices and deeds of todays generation will affect the quality of live of our future generation. The generation inhabiting Bangladesh today has an obligation to the next generation of our citizens; and aptly termed intergenerational justice. The decissions and actions we take today will affect our sons and daughters; the essence of our future. My fellow citizens we beg to ask the question, do we at all care? For example, last week in the popular resturant road of Banani a construction hopper crain hauling concrete to the top floors for a highrise building underconstruction crashed and killed three pedestrians below. Surely this could have been prevented. The pedestrians did not have to die, they had an expectation and the right that the construction company and their engineers would have taken adequate precaution around the construction site to ensure that lives of pedestrians are not at risk.

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Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

 generating responsibilities towards environment
  • Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

It is no wonder that as a developing country with very little land to spare we are constantly being asked to choose between development and the need to preserve the environment? And regrettably, in most cases we find that we are making the wrong choices by decimating nature to build up industrial estate in an unplanned manner. And this has come out very starkly in a report in this newspaper.

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Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

  • What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

On May 9, 201 3,The keeling curve (named after geochemist Charles David Keeling), which plots the constant changes in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii, recorded the daily average concentration of 400.03 per­parts­million (ppm). For the same 24­hour period, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego recorded a reading of 400.08 ppm. Climate scientists say that for the first time in at least 800,000 years, the mean atmospheric concentration of CO2 level has surpassed 400ppm. It means that, for every million air molecules, 400 are carbon dioxide. It has come as no surprise to us that global carbon dioxide was bound to exceed the threshold sooner or later, given the fact that the world communities have repeatedly failed to slow down global CO2 emissions.

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What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

  • Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

About 8,000 brick fields with half of them having no registration are presently operating in the country and nearly 33 per cent of the fuel used for the kilns derives from trees. Worse still, in some areas such as Cox’s Bazar, the ratio of using logs is 1 00 per cent. As we know it, using logs for baking bricks is a gross violation of environmental laws. While we are not unmindful of the need for attaining self ­sufficiency in producing bricks, we are truly worried at the trend of illegal use of logs for this what with its potential threats to environment. Therefore, we recommend immediate intervention on the part of the government to stop all illegal practices in this sector.

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Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

  • The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

Environmental security is intertwined with all the other dimensions of human security and is crucial not only to the well being of the people but also for their very survival, particularly since 30 per cent to 80 per cent of the life support services of people in developing countries come from natural resources and the environment. A large number of social, economic, and political conflicts and issues are also linked to environmental resources. Hence, without addressing environmental security it would not be possible to achieve the human security goals of the world.

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The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

  • Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

Systematic destruction of hills in Chittagong continues unabated causing serious environmental hazards. This has been going on for creating human settlements at the foot or slopes of the hills or for other purposes. Though it takes a heavy toll of human lives, livestock and property almost every year following landslides, there is no respite from hill cutting.

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Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

  • Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

A few days ago a school-going toddler was killed by a Milk Vita Company-owned car in Mirpur. When the baby suddenly heard the sound of a bike, she ran and went under the wheels of the car. Her mother watched the accident happen in front of her eyes. She couldn’t save the life of her dear daughter. The baby was killed on the spot.

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Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

  • Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

In an ironic twist to the saga of whether or not ships carrying toxic material would be allowed entry into the country, Bangladesh Ship Breakers Association (BSBA) has withdrawn its appeal against a High Court (HC) verdict given in 2009. This removes the last hurdle to the government’s plans to formulate legislation on ship breaking.

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Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

  • Environment in distress – The Daily Star

For the last three decades scientists and world leaders have been trying to cope with the consequences of exponential growth in human numbers and the increasingly frantic demands for the resources that only nature can provide. They have been working to save threatened species from extinction and to give the natural process of our world the chance to maintain a healthy global biosphere. That means some sacrifices and restraints. Evidently, we can no longer pursue short term prosperity without a thought for long term survival. People in some industrialised countries have missed the fact that efforts to achieve conservation of nature threaten human economic welfare. But nations realise that a good quality of life can only be made up of both material well­being as well as a healthy, productive and natural environment. For millions of people living in the less prosperous parts of the world, like Bangladesh, care and conservation of natural resources, restraint, and cautious disposal of toxic wastes, hazardous effluents and sludge from the industries are the only ways to improve conditions.

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Environment in distress – The Daily Star

Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

DHAKA – It was once the lifeline of the Bangladeshi capital. But the once mighty Buriganga river, which flows by Dhaka, is now one of the most polluted rivers in Bangladesh because of rampant dumping of industrial and human waste. “Much of the Buriganga is now gone, having fallen to ever insatiable land grabbers and industries dumping untreated effluents into the river,” said Ainun Nishat, a leading environmental expert.

Children collect rubbish on the river Buriganga in Dhaka May 17, 2009.      REUTERS/Andrew BirajPhoto-Children Collecting Rubbish from the river (Source-collected)

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Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

  • Accessibility to Riverfront: Improving Quality of Dhaka City Life 

Accessibility to Riverfront

  • Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

  • Hope in the Age of Man

Hope in the Age of Man

  • সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

  • রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ