Editorial or Newspaper Article

Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

 Since the beginning of the last century, fossil fuel power plants have drastically diminished the quality of the air we breathe by venting most of the undesirable contaminants into the atmosphere. Despite regulatory and technical progress in pollution control, the degradation of air quality still continues, albeit at a reduced rate. But how many of us are aware that power plants also pollute rivers, lakes, and oceans? Unfortunately, we hardly mention this kind of water pollution when discussing the general issue of pollution.

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Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

Thermal pollution of water by power plants
Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

The word “riparian” is derived from the Latin word ‘Ripa’ (river bank). Vegetations bordering water bodies are technically known as riparian vegetation. These vegetations are also called riverine or gallery vegetations as they are grown adjacent to or near rivers. Plant habitats and communities along the river margins and banks
are called riparian vegetation, characterized by hydrophilic plants. Riparian vegetations form the transition between the aquatic and the terrestrial ecosystem. A riparian zone or riparian area is the interface between land and water body. Riparian is also the proper nomenclature for one of the fifteen terrestrial biomes of the earth. They occur in many forms including grassland, woodland, wetland or even non­ vegetative.

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Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

 Riparian Vegetation
Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

THE World Heritage Convention has the responsibility of protecting outstanding natural and cultural areas that form a part of the heritage of all mankind. Bangladesh became a party to the Convention in 1983. The Convention ruled favourably on the nomination of a part of the Sundarbans as a World Heritage Site.

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Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

 Threat to ecology of Sundarbans
Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

The use of polythene bags is increasing in Dhaka and elsewhere, despite the government’s ban on the environmentally hazardous item, as most people and businesses have started to use it extensively again.
Even though the ban came in January 2002, the government could hardly find a competitive alternative for the people as well as the environment over the years.

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Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

 Polythene Pollution

Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

The proposed 1,320 MW Rampal Power Plant is an outcome of prime minister of Bangladesh Sheikh Hasina’s visit to India from 10­12 January 2010. As per article 35 of the 51 point joint communiqué issued from that visit, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed on February 20, 2010 between Indian Energy Secretaries of India and Bangladesh H S Brahma and Abul Kalam Azad in Dhaka. As per that MoU, India’s National Thermal Power Company (NTPC) and Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) was to set up the Bagerhat Coal Based power plant at Rampal jointly.

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Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

 Rampal Powerplant
Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

On the 20th of December, 201 0 an oil spill was detected in the Bay off Sitakunda in Chittagong. It was over 3 kilometers long and 300­400 feet wide with a reddish­ black layer. It is suspected that, the cause of the oil spill was the unauthorised transfer or intentional dump of oil into the sea to salvage the grounded Indian flag carrier Ocean Pearl. It was a huge spill but still it is unknown how much oil they actually released into the sea. We have yet to know to what extent the area was affected. The DoE has served a notice to Sygma Shipping Line,
the parent company of Ocean Pearl, to answer why the company would not be prosecuted for causing oil spill in the Bay. But we have yet to know what necessary action has been taken. So far we only know that the port authority has not taken any legal action against the Ocean Pearl.

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Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

 Oil spilling in Sundarban_1
Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

The year 201 0 was a momentous one in the history for international collaborative efforts in environmental governance. Under the landmark agreement of the Montreal Protocol countries around the world, in collaboration with industry, have individually and collectively succeeded in eliminating the production and consumption of the most severely damaging ozone depleting substances (ODSs), viz, CFCs, CTC and Halons. As many of these ODSs are powerful green house gases (GHGs) this achievement has also had a substantial contribution in mitigating climate change.

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Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

 green cooling
Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

In the lexicon of sustainable development there is an established concept of intergenerational justice and a chain of obligation. Simply put the choices and deeds of todays generation will affect the quality of live of our future generation. The generation inhabiting Bangladesh today has an obligation to the next generation of our citizens; and aptly termed intergenerational justice. The decissions and actions we take today will affect our sons and daughters; the essence of our future. My fellow citizens we beg to ask the question, do we at all care? For example, last week in the popular resturant road of Banani a construction hopper crain hauling concrete to the top floors for a highrise building underconstruction crashed and killed three pedestrians below. Surely this could have been prevented. The pedestrians did not have to die, they had an expectation and the right that the construction company and their engineers would have taken adequate precaution around the construction site to ensure that lives of pedestrians are not at risk.

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Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

 generating responsibilities towards environment
  • Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

It is no wonder that as a developing country with very little land to spare we are constantly being asked to choose between development and the need to preserve the environment? And regrettably, in most cases we find that we are making the wrong choices by decimating nature to build up industrial estate in an unplanned manner. And this has come out very starkly in a report in this newspaper.

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Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

  • What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

On May 9, 201 3,The keeling curve (named after geochemist Charles David Keeling), which plots the constant changes in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii, recorded the daily average concentration of 400.03 per­parts­million (ppm). For the same 24­hour period, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego recorded a reading of 400.08 ppm. Climate scientists say that for the first time in at least 800,000 years, the mean atmospheric concentration of CO2 level has surpassed 400ppm. It means that, for every million air molecules, 400 are carbon dioxide. It has come as no surprise to us that global carbon dioxide was bound to exceed the threshold sooner or later, given the fact that the world communities have repeatedly failed to slow down global CO2 emissions.

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What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

  • Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

About 8,000 brick fields with half of them having no registration are presently operating in the country and nearly 33 per cent of the fuel used for the kilns derives from trees. Worse still, in some areas such as Cox’s Bazar, the ratio of using logs is 1 00 per cent. As we know it, using logs for baking bricks is a gross violation of environmental laws. While we are not unmindful of the need for attaining self ­sufficiency in producing bricks, we are truly worried at the trend of illegal use of logs for this what with its potential threats to environment. Therefore, we recommend immediate intervention on the part of the government to stop all illegal practices in this sector.

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Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

  • The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

Environmental security is intertwined with all the other dimensions of human security and is crucial not only to the well being of the people but also for their very survival, particularly since 30 per cent to 80 per cent of the life support services of people in developing countries come from natural resources and the environment. A large number of social, economic, and political conflicts and issues are also linked to environmental resources. Hence, without addressing environmental security it would not be possible to achieve the human security goals of the world.

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The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

  • Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

Systematic destruction of hills in Chittagong continues unabated causing serious environmental hazards. This has been going on for creating human settlements at the foot or slopes of the hills or for other purposes. Though it takes a heavy toll of human lives, livestock and property almost every year following landslides, there is no respite from hill cutting.

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Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

  • Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

A few days ago a school-going toddler was killed by a Milk Vita Company-owned car in Mirpur. When the baby suddenly heard the sound of a bike, she ran and went under the wheels of the car. Her mother watched the accident happen in front of her eyes. She couldn’t save the life of her dear daughter. The baby was killed on the spot.

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Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

  • Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

In an ironic twist to the saga of whether or not ships carrying toxic material would be allowed entry into the country, Bangladesh Ship Breakers Association (BSBA) has withdrawn its appeal against a High Court (HC) verdict given in 2009. This removes the last hurdle to the government’s plans to formulate legislation on ship breaking.

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Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

  • Environment in distress – The Daily Star

For the last three decades scientists and world leaders have been trying to cope with the consequences of exponential growth in human numbers and the increasingly frantic demands for the resources that only nature can provide. They have been working to save threatened species from extinction and to give the natural process of our world the chance to maintain a healthy global biosphere. That means some sacrifices and restraints. Evidently, we can no longer pursue short term prosperity without a thought for long term survival. People in some industrialised countries have missed the fact that efforts to achieve conservation of nature threaten human economic welfare. But nations realise that a good quality of life can only be made up of both material well­being as well as a healthy, productive and natural environment. For millions of people living in the less prosperous parts of the world, like Bangladesh, care and conservation of natural resources, restraint, and cautious disposal of toxic wastes, hazardous effluents and sludge from the industries are the only ways to improve conditions.

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Environment in distress – The Daily Star

Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

DHAKA – It was once the lifeline of the Bangladeshi capital. But the once mighty Buriganga river, which flows by Dhaka, is now one of the most polluted rivers in Bangladesh because of rampant dumping of industrial and human waste. “Much of the Buriganga is now gone, having fallen to ever insatiable land grabbers and industries dumping untreated effluents into the river,” said Ainun Nishat, a leading environmental expert.

Children collect rubbish on the river Buriganga in Dhaka May 17, 2009.      REUTERS/Andrew BirajPhoto-Children Collecting Rubbish from the river (Source-collected)

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Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

  • Accessibility to Riverfront: Improving Quality of Dhaka City Life 

Accessibility to Riverfront

  • Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

  • Hope in the Age of Man

Hope in the Age of Man

  • সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

  • রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ

 

 

 

 

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