Tag Archives: Bangladesh

Hardinge Bridge- Celebration of 100 years

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Photo: Hardinge bridge at  Pabna

Physical work of the 1.8-km Hardinge Bridge had started in 1909 and completed 1915, bridge was partially damaged during the Liberation War, but Father of Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman took initiatives to reopen it. The bridge, runs between the railways stations Bheramara and Paksey in Pabna, was named for Viceroy of India, Lord Hardinge.

The construction on the bridge had begun on 1910 under the British Railway Department and it took two years to complete. British Engineer Mr. Gayle was in charge of the bridge’s construction. The first train moved on the bridge on January 1, 1915 as an engineering test while the bridge was officially inaugurated by Lord Hardinge on March, 4 that year. Recently in Pabna, the one hundred year anniversary of the historic bridge was observed acknowledging the architectural genius that went into constructing the bridge a hundred years ago.

On august 22, 2015 Hardinge bridge  centenary has been celebrated. International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering (IABSE) and Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE) jointly arranged a function on the occasion at a programme in a city hotel. Finance minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith and Railways Minister Mazibul Hoque spoke at the function held with professor Dr Jamilur Reza Choudhury in the chair. Professor Dr K Nogami of Tokyo Metropolitan University also spoke at the function, attended by delegates from various countries. Architect Kazi Anisuddin Iqbal, Director, FPD (Forum for Physical Development) attended the program.

Thesis/ Report

  • Updated Bangladesh National Building Code – BNBC (Part-4)

Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) was first drafted in 1993 but not formally reviewed and updated. Since then, major changes have taken place in every discipline of the Building technology. To make this code time worthy, Ministry of Housing and Public Works formed a steering committee with the responsibility of Updating BNBC 1993 by a G.O. having circular no. Section 8/IM-5/93(part) 812 (28) date:15.09.2008. The Housing and Building Research Institute (HBRI) has been entrusted with thetask of providing secretarial service to the steering committee and managing the implementation of the project. In response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) from HBRI,Bureau of Research, Testing and Consultation (BRTC) of Bangladesh University ofEngineering and Technology (BUET) submitted Technical and Financial proposals for updating the code. Consequently an agreement was signed between HBRI and BRTC on the15th of December, 2009 giving the task of updating the Code to BRTC, BUET. In this regard, An Inception Report to update the BNBC has already been approved by the concerned authority.

For more details please follow the link below:

Report with Recommendations for Updated BNBC Part 4

Editorial / Newspaper Article

Earthquake: A warning – The Daily Star

A magnitude­ 6.8 earthquake was felt across the country on September 1 8 evening, shaking buildings in the capital and elsewhere. Panic gripped common people. The US Geological Survey said on its website the quake was centered 64 km (40 miles) northwest of Gangtok, capital of northeastern state Sikkim and below 20 km of the surface.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Earthquake: A warning – The Daily Star

Forecasting earthquake forces – The Daily Star

Stony Brook University researchers have devised a numerical model to help explain the linkage between earthquakes and the powerful forces that cause them, according to a research paper scheduled to be published in the journal Science on Feb. 1 7. Their findings hold implications for long­term forecasting of earthquakes.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Forecasting earthquake forces – The Daily Star 

Fore shocks predict earthquakes! – The Daily Star

After a destructive earthquake, scientists sifting through the rumbles that preceded the big event often find fore shocks.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Fore shocks predict earthquakes! – The Daily Star

Surviving the worst earthquake in living memoryReturning to Tokyo after nearly a year upon conclusion of my almost four years stint as Bangladesh Ambassador to Japan, in the last week of the wintry month of February, naturally made me feel very nostalgic.

The fateful day of March 1 1 broke at dawn with bright sunshine. It was a beautiful day with a clear blue sky and without any sign of bad weather, let alone a catastrophe.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Surviving the worst earthquake in living memory

  • Bangladesh 6th ‘high-risk country – The Daily Star

A leading disaster watchdog has ranked Bangladesh as the world’s sixth “high disaster risk country” in terms of its exposure to typhoons, earthquake and tsunamis. he German-based United Nations University (UNU) Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS) in its ‘World Risk Report-2011′ said Bangladesh ranked second in its risk index in Asia after the Philippines.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Bangladesh 6th ‘high-risk country – The Daily Star

  • Earthquake preparedness in Bangladesh – The Daily Sun

The devastation that has been wrought recently by the massive earthquake in Japan should come as a grim but timely reminder to the authorities that Bangladesh, too, is vulnerable to earthquakes. The country lies on a major geological fault line and has suffered seven significant tremors in the 20th century alone. Food and Disaster Management Minister Abdur Razzaque’s emphasis on the need to enhance regional cooperation among South Asian countries to effectively tackle the challenge that is likely to emerge in the aftermath of a quake should be interpreted as a justifiable and time­befitting call. His call for regional cooperation in this regard came when he was inaugurating a four­day ‘First Regional Earthquake Response Seminar’ in the city on Monday.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Earthquake preparedness in Bangladesh – The Daily Sun

  • Earthquake preparedness limping –  Financial Express

In December last, a moderate earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale jolted parts of the country including the capital. The quake was felt in Dhaka, Chittagong, Cox’s Bazar, Bandarban, Khagrachhari, Rangamati, Sylhet, Comilla, Gazipur and Brahmanbaria. No damage or loss of life was recorded in the incident.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Earthquake preparedness limping –  Financial Express

  • Looming earthquake risk: How prepared are we? – The Daily Sun

Bangladesh is among the 20 most vulnerable countries to earthquake. According to experts, 65% area of Bangladesh is under the threat of extreme earthquake as Bangladesh is situated between three plate boundaries. One of these boundary lines is connected to the foothill of the Himalayas and is marked as the most dangerous source for severe earthquake. One CDMP study identified several active faults within Bangladesh based on historical events and evidence from geological investigations. In addition, inside the country and in the surrounding areas, there are numerous geographic scratches which are also the sources of earthquake. Among the scratches the most dangerous one is Rakhain Scratch, which is within 300 km of Chittagong, and the Madhupur and Dauki faults are
about 90 and 230 miles away from Dhaka respectively. Due to the geographical orientation, Dhaka, Chittagong, Sylhet, Mymensing, Rangpur and north­eastern extended areas of Bangladesh are under constant threat of earthquake.

For more details please follow the link  below:

Looming earthquake risk: How prepared are we? – The Daily Sun

Newspaper Reference

 

  •  Tilted Demra building being demolished-the Daily Star

Owner of the three-storey residential building, that tilted early Monday in Demra on the outskirts of the capital, started demolishing it yesterday.
The building on Madrasah Road at Purba Hajinagar leaned on an adjoining six-storey building at midnight prompting Narayanganj district administration to evacuate immediately six families residing in the building.
For more details please follow the link below:

Tilted Demra building being demolished-the Daily Star

 

  • Savar Building Collapse : Germany to provide 2.5m Euros for job reintegration-The Daily Star

As a part of its long-term engagement in the garment sector of Bangladesh, the German government will provide 2.5 million Euros for a project giving job reintegration support to those who have become disabled in the collapse of the nine-storey Rana Plaza in Savar

For more details please follow the link below:

Savar Building Collapse : Germany to provide 2.5m Euros for job reintegration-The Daily Star

  •  Savar Building Collapse : Victims
    Indian, German govts offer rehab help -The Daily Star

The Indian and German governments yesterday offered assistance to rehabilitate the Savar building collapse victims to help the disabled persons regain their mobility, enabling them to lead a life in dignity and again work for their living.

For more details please follow the link below:

Savar Building Collapse : Victims Indian, German govts offer rehab help -The Daily Star

  • Stop use of residential buildings for industries-The Daily Star

Deadly building collapses may recur unless the government immediately identifies and stops the illegal use of residential buildings for readymade garments factories and other industries, leading civil engineers said at a discussion yesterday.

For more details please follow the link below:

Stop use of residential buildings for industries-The Daily Star

  • US wants rapid progress on building safety issue-The Daily Sun

DHAKA: US Secretary of State John Kerry has urged rapid progress both on fire and building safety inspection issues in Bangladesh and on quick passage of labour law amendments.

For more details please follow the link below:

US wants rapid progress on building safety issue-The Daily Sun

  • অভিজ্ঞতাকে কাজে লাগাতে হবে

সাভারের ভবনধসের ১৭ দিন পর একজনকে জীবিত উদ্ধার করার ঘটনাটি এক কথায় অসাধারণ। এটা আমাদের উদ্ধার-প্রক্রিয়ার একটি সফলতা হিসেবেই দেখতে হবে। অন্যদিকে মৃতের সংখ্যা হাজার অতিক্রম করাটাও খুব দুঃখজনক। মৃতের সংখ্যার বিবেচনায় এটা বিশ্বের সবচেয়ে ভয়াবহতম দুর্ঘটনা। আমাদের এখনই এমনভাবে কাজ শুরু করতে হবে, যাতে ভবিষ্যতে এ ধরনের দুর্ঘটনা আর না ঘটে। তবে দুর্ঘটনা যদি ঘটে যায়ও, তাহলে কীভাবে সবচেয়ে বেশিসংখ্যক মানুষকে নিরাপদে উদ্ধার করা যায়, তা নিয়ে নতুনভাবে চিন্তা করার আছে।

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

অভিজ্ঞতাকে কাজে লাগাতে হবে

  • বালু উত্তোলনে হুমকির মুখে বৃটিশ আমলের সেতু

ঠাকুরগাঁওয়ে নির্মাণাধীন জেলা সার্ভার স্টেশনের মাটি ভরাট করার জন্য শহরের টাংগন নদীর উপর শত বছরের পুরাতন লোহার ব্রীজের নিচ থেকে ড্রেজিং মেশিন দিয়ে বালু তোলা হচ্ছে। এতে হুমকির মুখে পড়েছে সেতুটি।

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

বালু উত্তোলনে হুমকির মুখে বৃটিশ আমলের সেতু

Policy_Act_Plan

  • Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan – 2008

Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and will become even more so as a result of climate change. Sections I to V of the document provide the context, outline the implications and likely impacts of climate change in Bangladesh, provide an overview of different adaptation strategies and briefly outline mitigation issues.

For detail report please follow the link below:

Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan 2008

  • Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan-2009

The document provides emphasize on the fact that it is essential that Bangladesh prepares now to adapt to climate change and safeguard the future well-being of her people. Sections I to V of the document provide the context, outline the implications and likely impacts of climate change in Bangladesh, provide an overview of different adaptation strategies and briefly outline mitigation issues. Sections VI to VII describe a ten year programme to build the capacity and resilience of the country to meet the challenge of climate change over the next 20-25 years.

For detail report please follow the link below:

Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan-2009

  • Bangladesh National Building Code 2006

The BNBC contains general requirements for the structural design of buildings, structures and components thereof. These requirements should be applied to all buildings regulated by this code.

For knowing detail about BNBC please follow the link below:

Bangladesh National Building Code. PDF 

  • The Building Construction Act 1952

The Building Construction Act is provided for the prevention of haphazard construction of buildings. The act contains all the regulation related with building construction.

To know detail about the act follow the link below:

Building-construction-Act-1952

  • Coastal Zone Policy 2005

The Coastal Zone Policy consists existing coastal setting, area of management and coastal policies.

To know detail about the policy follow the link below:

http://fpd-bd.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Coastal-Zone-Policy1.pdf

  • Disaster Management Plan

The National Plan for Disaster Management is indicative to what the relevant regional and  sectoral plans would consider to address the key issues like risk reduction, capacity building, climate change adaptation, livelihood security, gender mainstreaming, community empowerment and response and recovery management.

To know detail about disaster management plan follow the link bellow:

http://fpd-bd.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Disaster-Management-Plan.pdf

  • Ganges Water Sharing Treaty

The government of the people’s republic of Bangladesh and the government of the republic of India, determined to promote and strengthen their relations of friendship and good neighborliness through Ganges Water Sharing Treaty.

To know details about the Treaty follow the link below:

Gganges_Water_Sharing_treaty1996

  • Integrated Multi Modal Transport Policy

The integrated transport policy is intended to extend choice in transport and secure mobility in a way that supports sustainable development. Achievement of the Millennium Development Goals is, in part, reliant on a cheap and efficient transport system. The transport system in Bangladesh is intended to be safe, efficient, clean and fair.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Integrated Multi Modal Transport Model Draft Final 2008

  • National Water Policy

The National Water Policy describes the right, access ,use of water and distribution of water  of the country.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National_Water_Policy_BD

National_Water_Policy_BD_Eng

  • National Environment Management Action Plan

National Environment Management Action Plan deals integrating environment in all  development activities and achieving environmentally sound development planning

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National-Environment-Management-Action-Plan-1995

  • Elevated Law 2011

To ease traffic flow of large cities of Bangladesh, elevated expressway is a new option for future sustainable transport development. As land acquisition is related with the implementation of Elevated Expressway Project, there lies an importance of a legal document related with such kind of development.

Elevated Law 2011 has been established to guide the land acquisition process of elevated expressway projects.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

ElevatedLaw2011

  • Haritage Gazzete

The haritage gazzete describes the list of historical places of Dhaka city including buildings and special areas which should be conserved as heritage site.

The detail list of the sites are stated in the following link:

HaritazeGazette

  • Private Residential Land Development Rule 2004

Due to rapid growth of the city, planned urbanization is a major concern. Private Residential Land Development Rule 2004 is a guideline for development  and construction of various physical and social infrastructures for national development.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

house_land_dev_rule_2004

  • Land Acquisition Law for Padma Bridge

For the implementation of Padma bridge project, a land acquisition law has been established as a large amount of land have to be acquired for the implementation of the project.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Land Acquisition Law for Padma Bridge

  • Constitution (Third Amendment) Act, 1974

The Constitution Act, 1974 is an agreement between the Governments of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh and the Republic of India regarding the excluded territories and included territories specially the land boundaries of Bangladesh and India as well.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Land_boundary_agreement_1974

  • National Land Transport Policy 2004

National Land Transport Policy is established to ensure the proper physical and institutional infrastructure transport in order to achieve national development in Bangladesh.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Land-Transport-Policy

  • Master Plan of Haor Areas

As Haor area is a major economic zone of Bangladesh, the development in the area should be properly planned. For that purpose, a master plan has been prepared to direct future development options based on analysis of the problems, issues, opportunities, strengths and risks of different sectors.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Master plan of haor areas

  • Bangladesh National Programme of Action for Protection of the Coastal and Marine Environment from Land-Based Activities

Bangladesh is one of the largest deltas in the world, with a network of 230 rivers and rivulets and a coastline of 710 kilometers, hosting an unique diversity of ecosystems.  The coast of Bangladesh is identified as a zone of multiple vulnerabilities and prone to severe natural disasters. The coastal and marine environment is also under threat. To reduce these problems Bangladesh: National Programme of Action for Protection of the Coastal and Marine Environment from Land-Based Activities has been prepared.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National Program of Action for Protection of the Coastal and Marine Environment from Land Based Activities

  • National Road Safety Strategic Action Plan: 2011 – 2013

Nowadays, the number of vehicles is steadily increasing along with the increase of road
mileage.  In recent years, good roads are being constructed adding speed to transportation and frequency of movement of people. Simultaneously number of road accidents is also soaring high. Road accidents in Bangladesh claim lives and properties of people. The national loss due to road accident is estimated around 5000 crore every year. It is feared that with the continued expansion of the road network and the growth of traffic, this adverse trend is likely to continue in the future unless effective remedial measures are taken with co-ordination of all concerned agencies through national action plans. National Road Safety Strategic Action Plan 2011-2013 has been established to guide the safety measures in transportation sector.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National Road Safety Strategic Action Plan 2011-2013

  • National Urban Sector Policy 2011 (draft)

Cities and towns are playing a crucial role in the national development of Bangladesh. In order to achieve a sustainable urban development, National Urban Sector Policy 2011 has been established.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National_Urban_Sector_Policy_2011_Bangladesh_Draft

  • National Housing Policy 2001

National Housing Policy has been developed to create affordability, specially, for the middle and low income groups  as well as to ensure development of housing for the poor and needy and housing for the majority rural population through the use of different instruments like free land, cross-subsidy and concessionary finance etc. The major emphasis of the policy is on resource mobilization, land availability, incentives for home ownership, incentives to developers and constructors and promotion of research and development activities to make construction cost effective.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

National-Housing-Policy-2001

  • Paurashava Act 2009

Paurashava Act 2009 has been established to provide a detail guideline for a municipality area.

To know details about the Act follow the link below:

Paurashava_Act_2009

  • Open Space and Water body Conservation Act 2000

Open Space and Water body Conservation Act 2000 has been established to conserve the open space, play field, forest and natural water body of metropolitan area, divisional town, district town and municipality areas of the country.

To know details about the Act follow the link below:

PondOpenSpace

  • Real Estate Act 2010

As real estate development and management along with other relevant issues requires a proper guideline, Real Estate Act 2010 has been established.

To know details about the Act follow the link below:

Real_Estate_Act_2010

  • Strategic Transport Plan for Dhaka 2005

The impact of rapid growth of population in Dhaka has major consequences on the ability of the transport sector to provide mobility for all people as they seek to take advantage of employment, education, health and social opportunities. Strategic Transport Plan for Dhaka 2005 has been established to serve existing transport needs better and to prepare an overall framework for a multi-modal transport system that effectively serves current and future land uses.

To know details about the Plan follow the link below:

The Strategic Transport Plan for Dhaka

Strategic Transport Plan (Draft) 2005

  • The Custom Act 1969

The Custom Act 1969 has been established to provide guideline for transit of goods across Bangladesh to foreign territory and vice versa.

To know details about the Act follow the link below:

The Custom Act 1969

  • The Environment Pollution Control Ordinance, 1977

The Environment Pollution Control Ordinance, 1977 is an Ordinance to provide for the control, prevention and abatement of pollution of the environment of Bangladesh.

To know details about the Ordinance follow the link below:

The Environment Pollution Control Ordinance, 1977

  • Water Resources Planning Act 1992

Water Resources Planning Act 1992 was established to enhance the development of water resources and also to ensure the equitable distribution of the resources.

To know details about the Act follow the link below:

Warpo_Act

  • National Policy for Safe Water Supply & Sanitation 1998

National Policy for Safe Water Supply & Sanitation 1998 has been established to ensure that all people have access to safe water and sanitation services at an affordable cost. It has been established to ensure that development in the water supply and sanitation sector is equitable and sustainable.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Water-Supply-amp-Sanitation-Policy-1998

  • National Policy for Rural Development, 2001

As the development of rural area is the prerequisite for the overall improvement of Bangladesh, National Policy for Rural Development, 2001 has been established to create the pathway for sustainable development in rural areas.

To know details about the Policy follow the link below:

Rural-Development-Policy

Editorial or Newspaper Article

Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

 Since the beginning of the last century, fossil fuel power plants have drastically diminished the quality of the air we breathe by venting most of the undesirable contaminants into the atmosphere. Despite regulatory and technical progress in pollution control, the degradation of air quality still continues, albeit at a reduced rate. But how many of us are aware that power plants also pollute rivers, lakes, and oceans? Unfortunately, we hardly mention this kind of water pollution when discussing the general issue of pollution.

For more details please follow the link below:

Thermal pollution of water by power plants – The Daily Star

Thermal pollution of water by power plants
Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

The word “riparian” is derived from the Latin word ‘Ripa’ (river bank). Vegetations bordering water bodies are technically known as riparian vegetation. These vegetations are also called riverine or gallery vegetations as they are grown adjacent to or near rivers. Plant habitats and communities along the river margins and banks
are called riparian vegetation, characterized by hydrophilic plants. Riparian vegetations form the transition between the aquatic and the terrestrial ecosystem. A riparian zone or riparian area is the interface between land and water body. Riparian is also the proper nomenclature for one of the fifteen terrestrial biomes of the earth. They occur in many forms including grassland, woodland, wetland or even non­ vegetative.

For more details please follow the link below:

Riparian vegetation: A corridor for environmental stability – The Daily Star

 Riparian Vegetation
Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

THE World Heritage Convention has the responsibility of protecting outstanding natural and cultural areas that form a part of the heritage of all mankind. Bangladesh became a party to the Convention in 1983. The Convention ruled favourably on the nomination of a part of the Sundarbans as a World Heritage Site.

For more details please follow the link below:

Threat to ecology of Sundarbans – The Daily Star

 Threat to ecology of Sundarbans
Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

The use of polythene bags is increasing in Dhaka and elsewhere, despite the government’s ban on the environmentally hazardous item, as most people and businesses have started to use it extensively again.
Even though the ban came in January 2002, the government could hardly find a competitive alternative for the people as well as the environment over the years.

For more details please follow the link below:

Polythene Pollution Restrictions must be totally enforced – The Daily Star

 Polythene Pollution

Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

The proposed 1,320 MW Rampal Power Plant is an outcome of prime minister of Bangladesh Sheikh Hasina’s visit to India from 10­12 January 2010. As per article 35 of the 51 point joint communiqué issued from that visit, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed on February 20, 2010 between Indian Energy Secretaries of India and Bangladesh H S Brahma and Abul Kalam Azad in Dhaka. As per that MoU, India’s National Thermal Power Company (NTPC) and Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) was to set up the Bagerhat Coal Based power plant at Rampal jointly.

For more details please follow the link below:

Why the EIA study is not acceptable – The Daily Star

 Rampal Powerplant
Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

On the 20th of December, 201 0 an oil spill was detected in the Bay off Sitakunda in Chittagong. It was over 3 kilometers long and 300­400 feet wide with a reddish­ black layer. It is suspected that, the cause of the oil spill was the unauthorised transfer or intentional dump of oil into the sea to salvage the grounded Indian flag carrier Ocean Pearl. It was a huge spill but still it is unknown how much oil they actually released into the sea. We have yet to know to what extent the area was affected. The DoE has served a notice to Sygma Shipping Line,
the parent company of Ocean Pearl, to answer why the company would not be prosecuted for causing oil spill in the Bay. But we have yet to know what necessary action has been taken. So far we only know that the port authority has not taken any legal action against the Ocean Pearl.

For more details please follow the link below:

Oil spill: Impact on marine environment – The Daily Star

 Oil spilling in Sundarban_1
Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

The year 201 0 was a momentous one in the history for international collaborative efforts in environmental governance. Under the landmark agreement of the Montreal Protocol countries around the world, in collaboration with industry, have individually and collectively succeeded in eliminating the production and consumption of the most severely damaging ozone depleting substances (ODSs), viz, CFCs, CTC and Halons. As many of these ODSs are powerful green house gases (GHGs) this achievement has also had a substantial contribution in mitigating climate change.

For more details please follow the link below:

Green cooling for warming world – The Daily Star

 green cooling
Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

In the lexicon of sustainable development there is an established concept of intergenerational justice and a chain of obligation. Simply put the choices and deeds of todays generation will affect the quality of live of our future generation. The generation inhabiting Bangladesh today has an obligation to the next generation of our citizens; and aptly termed intergenerational justice. The decissions and actions we take today will affect our sons and daughters; the essence of our future. My fellow citizens we beg to ask the question, do we at all care? For example, last week in the popular resturant road of Banani a construction hopper crain hauling concrete to the top floors for a highrise building underconstruction crashed and killed three pedestrians below. Surely this could have been prevented. The pedestrians did not have to die, they had an expectation and the right that the construction company and their engineers would have taken adequate precaution around the construction site to ensure that lives of pedestrians are not at risk.

For more details please follow the link below:

Generational rights and responsibilities towards the environment – The Daily Star

 generating responsibilities towards environment
  • Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

It is no wonder that as a developing country with very little land to spare we are constantly being asked to choose between development and the need to preserve the environment? And regrettably, in most cases we find that we are making the wrong choices by decimating nature to build up industrial estate in an unplanned manner. And this has come out very starkly in a report in this newspaper.

For more details please follow the link below:

Why the decimation of nature? – The Daily Star

  • What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

On May 9, 201 3,The keeling curve (named after geochemist Charles David Keeling), which plots the constant changes in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii, recorded the daily average concentration of 400.03 per­parts­million (ppm). For the same 24­hour period, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego recorded a reading of 400.08 ppm. Climate scientists say that for the first time in at least 800,000 years, the mean atmospheric concentration of CO2 level has surpassed 400ppm. It means that, for every million air molecules, 400 are carbon dioxide. It has come as no surprise to us that global carbon dioxide was bound to exceed the threshold sooner or later, given the fact that the world communities have repeatedly failed to slow down global CO2 emissions.

For more details please follow the link below:

What does 400ppm mean to us? – The Daily Sun

  • Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

About 8,000 brick fields with half of them having no registration are presently operating in the country and nearly 33 per cent of the fuel used for the kilns derives from trees. Worse still, in some areas such as Cox’s Bazar, the ratio of using logs is 1 00 per cent. As we know it, using logs for baking bricks is a gross violation of environmental laws. While we are not unmindful of the need for attaining self ­sufficiency in producing bricks, we are truly worried at the trend of illegal use of logs for this what with its potential threats to environment. Therefore, we recommend immediate intervention on the part of the government to stop all illegal practices in this sector.

For more details please follow the link below:

Triple jeopardy for environment in brick fields Adopt safer means to burn bricks – The Daily Star

  • The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

Environmental security is intertwined with all the other dimensions of human security and is crucial not only to the well being of the people but also for their very survival, particularly since 30 per cent to 80 per cent of the life support services of people in developing countries come from natural resources and the environment. A large number of social, economic, and political conflicts and issues are also linked to environmental resources. Hence, without addressing environmental security it would not be possible to achieve the human security goals of the world.

For more details please follow the link below:

The role of union parishad in environmental security – Financial Express

  • Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

Systematic destruction of hills in Chittagong continues unabated causing serious environmental hazards. This has been going on for creating human settlements at the foot or slopes of the hills or for other purposes. Though it takes a heavy toll of human lives, livestock and property almost every year following landslides, there is no respite from hill cutting.

For more details please follow the link below:

Protecting hills from destruction – Financial Express

  • Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

A few days ago a school-going toddler was killed by a Milk Vita Company-owned car in Mirpur. When the baby suddenly heard the sound of a bike, she ran and went under the wheels of the car. Her mother watched the accident happen in front of her eyes. She couldn’t save the life of her dear daughter. The baby was killed on the spot.

For more details please follow the link below:

Noise pollution: A major concern of urban life – Financial Express

  • Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

In an ironic twist to the saga of whether or not ships carrying toxic material would be allowed entry into the country, Bangladesh Ship Breakers Association (BSBA) has withdrawn its appeal against a High Court (HC) verdict given in 2009. This removes the last hurdle to the government’s plans to formulate legislation on ship breaking.

For more details please follow the link below:

Good news for the environment No bar to strict regulation on ship breaking – The Daily Star

  • Environment in distress – The Daily Star

For the last three decades scientists and world leaders have been trying to cope with the consequences of exponential growth in human numbers and the increasingly frantic demands for the resources that only nature can provide. They have been working to save threatened species from extinction and to give the natural process of our world the chance to maintain a healthy global biosphere. That means some sacrifices and restraints. Evidently, we can no longer pursue short term prosperity without a thought for long term survival. People in some industrialised countries have missed the fact that efforts to achieve conservation of nature threaten human economic welfare. But nations realise that a good quality of life can only be made up of both material well­being as well as a healthy, productive and natural environment. For millions of people living in the less prosperous parts of the world, like Bangladesh, care and conservation of natural resources, restraint, and cautious disposal of toxic wastes, hazardous effluents and sludge from the industries are the only ways to improve conditions.

For more details please follow the link below:

Environment in distress – The Daily Star

Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

DHAKA – It was once the lifeline of the Bangladeshi capital. But the once mighty Buriganga river, which flows by Dhaka, is now one of the most polluted rivers in Bangladesh because of rampant dumping of industrial and human waste. “Much of the Buriganga is now gone, having fallen to ever insatiable land grabbers and industries dumping untreated effluents into the river,” said Ainun Nishat, a leading environmental expert.

Children collect rubbish on the river Buriganga in Dhaka May 17, 2009.      REUTERS/Andrew BirajPhoto-Children Collecting Rubbish from the river (Source-collected)

For more details please follow the link below:

Bangladesh river pollution threatens millions

  • Accessibility to Riverfront: Improving Quality of Dhaka City Life 

Accessibility to Riverfront

  • Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

Necessity for ‘Culture of Disaster Preparedness’

  • Hope in the Age of Man

Hope in the Age of Man

  • সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

সুন্দরবন থেকে বঙ্গোপসাগর

  • রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ

বিস্তারিত নীচের লিংকে

রামপাল ও সুন্দরবনের দূষণ

 

 

 

 

ROUND TABLE CONFERENCE : OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

Construction activities have been increasing day by day in all over Bangladesh. Size of projects is also becoming larger and involvement of manpower in this sector is very high. Construction technology is also changing, technical knowledge is increasing. Unfortunately, numbers of occupational hazards are also increasing which ideally should have a reverse effect. i.e., the more technology is upgraded the risk factors should have been reduced. It has been observed that our workers are not properly trained about the safe working procedures, even the professionals are found unaware of safety requirements. In recent time some devastating accident occurred in different projects which concerned our citizens. Realizing this crisis, Forum for Physical Development of Bangladesh has arranged a series of Round Table Conferences on “Occupational Safety and Health in Construction Sector” with participation of relevant professionals. The main focus of these Round Table Conferences will be awareness building on construction safety.

Author: Nasira Karim Audhuna, Research Associate, Forum for Physical Development of Bangladesh; Email: fpdbd.info@gmail.com.bd

For more and detail description of each conferences please go through the following links

ROUND TABLE CONFERENCES ON RENEWAL PROSPECT OF RURAL HABITAT

Forum for Physical Development (FPD) has started its journey to represent the idea of professionals in front of general citizen with a social commitment. This non- profitable organization destined to create a useful platform for the Professionals who want to contribute to the development of the country. FPD collects the ideas and comments of different professionals on different topics through Discussions, Seminars, and Lectures and make available for the Policy makers of the country and also publish them for the concerned citizens. In the words of Dr. Toufiq. M. Seraj, Chairman of FPD, “Our main aim is to create a platform in where the skilled, experienced and qualified people from multi-disciplined professions can represent their acquired knowledge towards the general people.”Also, Architect Anisuddin Iqbal Executive Director of FPD,  “In that case, we will do a publication by accumulating the information found on several round table conferences focusing the most significant subjects. And also, identifying some strategies to solve the problem, we will encourage the policy-makers.”

Recently, FPD was working on “Renewal Prospect of Rural Habitat in Bangladesh”. The mentioned topic was taken up as it needs vivid discussion and should involve professionals from diverse disciplines. To collect ideas on this regard and accumulate solutions from different point of view four round table conferences had been organized by FPD. Experts and Professionals have been invited to share their opinions so that new solution can come out. The idea of these conferences was to contribute in the National Housing Policy of Bangladesh by providing some noticeable policy guideline regarding resettlement of rural housing. According to Dr. Toufiq. M. Seraj, “You know that National Housing Policy is still not implemented. We will try to formulate multi-sector policy guideline through this forum and publish that. Our present discussion on Renewal prospect of rural habitat is not only a single sector issue. Utility services, disasters, environment etc are related with this.”

Professional opinion regarding the resettlement of rural habitat was, it is a very important issue that should be taken under immediate consideration. In their point of view, it is necessary to renew the rural settlement to discourage unplanned and rapid urbanization. So, it is required to make the villages more livable. There are so many positive outcomes regarding this prospect along with its upcoming urgent need. It has been raised in the conferences that, in every year, about 1% to 2% cultivable land is decreasing in Bangladesh due to building housing in rural areas.  Also, employment opportunities are declining in villages. So it is high time to think about the betterment of rural people. In addition, if employment opportunities can be provided in the rural places then rural to urban migration can be restricted that will help to lessen extra pressure on city life. Overall, if resettlement can be initiated in rural areas of Bangladesh so many noticeable possible outcomes will take place in the development of the country. For example, change will come in lifestyle of the rural people; next generation will follow the way of new life, national economic growth and living standard of people hoped to be enhanced than in present.

At the end of these four round table conferences some important issues have generated regarding the renewal prospect of rural habitat. At first, the concept that had attracted almost everyone was the Concept of “Compact Township (CT)”. Professor Dr. Selim Rashid, University of Illinois, U.S.A., gave the idea of Compact Township in the first conference. According to him CT should be a properly planned residential area containing planned housing, apartment, hospital, school, college, shops, rural industries, local government administrative body and other civic facilities. Again, it was also being emphasized that it has to be kept in mind that Compact Township should not disturb the harmony of rural lifestyle.

For compact township (CT) to be initiated first and foremost thing is to find a suitable location. Several recommendations have been derived thought the round table conferences regarding this matter.  Growth centers in rural areas were given priority in terms of choosing the location for CT. It has been raised in the discussions that that compact towns will be established focusing significant Hut-Bazars or where the infrastructures have already been improved with connection to well-designed roads and good rail transportation system. Also, it has been said that CTs have to be build above the flood level. This two issues were considered as if there will proper communication and transportation system it will be possible to build good urban-rural linkage  and development of CT above flood level will reduce the extra cost that will generate from disaster preparedness. Also, professional were emphasized on using the locally available material i.e. bamboo, fence, tin, pale etc for the construction of building in CT. In addition they emphasized on

Creating employment opportunities in CTs was one of the major concerns of the professionals.  It has been said in the conferences that, there would be economics of scale in CTs like other towns. Small business organizations would be developed there; in parallel way, small industries would be grown spontaneously. It was raised through discussions that regional production based products and agricultural industry can be encouraged to establish in rural areas.  Income of the rural people can be increased by cooperative societies in agriculture, livestock, poultry and fishery. Professionals present in the conferences also emphasized on education development for transforming agro based rural society to modernized community. Again, actions should be taken to protect small farmers from being landless. It has been said in the discussion that in village, every house should have own income generating source like Srilanka where each household has its own income source. It has also been raised in the discussions that garments industries can be decentralized towards Rangpur or Kurigram in where ‘Monga’ affected people live so that new income sources can be initiated there. Overall, the villages have to be self-sustained in terms of external environment, societal structure and economic increment.

Several environmental aspects have been considered in respect to resettlement of rural habitat.  For instance, professional said that sustainable habitat has to be ensured keeping harmony in connection with local climate and environment, agriculture and electricity production might be ensured through solar energy. Also, it has been raised bio-gas can be produced through waste management process. Environment friendly waste management should be ensured for every family. In addition they suggested, bio-gas can also be formed from the wastes of domestic ducks and hens. Main fact is that, it should be kept in mind that bio-diversity should not be changed due to housing resettlement. Several land management and administrative issues have also been focused during the discussions. Professionals emphasized on ensuring the creation of effective local government to deal with local problems. They said that to increase local resilience land can be redistributed among the landless people through the land conservation and this decisions will be made through local government.

Professional present in the conferences also emphasize on gathering local people’s opinion before taking any initiative for the resettlement. They said that, resettlement of rural housing can be a successful step if active participation of local people and quality of life standard can be ensured. According to them, rural population is self sufficient to face the natural calamities such as flood, cyclone etc in the light of experience of older people. So having followed the knowledge, experience and strategy of local people, rural housing has to be developed. So at first, opinion of local people should be taken.

Some major constrains regarding the implementation of the projects has also been discussed in the conferences. They consider that, though the idea of Compact Township sounds good but it will be difficult to execute as motivation local people will not be a easy task. People will not leave the habitat where they are living for generations. For this, at first it is necessary to select the target group and make them aware of the projects. Again, one of the major obstacles for such initiative can be the responsibility distribution and raising awareness of rural people. In addition, it is a major problem that there is no sufficient khas land except forest and char area. It will be a difficulty while acquiring land for rural resettlement. Rural people would not agree to give up their traditional values and inherited land. So, planners, policy maker and other governing bodies have to work in root level and government has to give subsidy in different aspect and also it has to use its remittance in this sector.

Author: Nasira Karim Audhuna, Research Associate, Forum for Physical Development of Bangladesh; Email: fpdbd.info@gmail.com

For more and the detail description of each conferences go to the following links.

 

3rd Round Table Discussion : OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

Forum for Physical Development of Bangladesh (FPD) arranged a series of round table discussions on September 14, 2011 and October 15, 2011. As confirmation of those FPD arranged their third round table on 25th October. The third round table discussion was also regarding “Occupational Safety and Health in Construction Sector.”

The round table conference was presided over by Dr. Toufiq M. Seraj, Chairman, FPD and moderated by Kazi Anisuddin Iqbal, Executive Director, FPD. On the advent of the round table, Toufiq M. Seraj described the aims and objectives of FPD.

Continue reading 3rd Round Table Discussion : OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

2nd Round Table Discussion: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

Forum for Physical Development of Bangladesh (FPD) has arranged a series of round table discussions on September 14, 2011. On the consequence of that round table FPD has arranged their second round table on 15th October. The second round table discussion was regarding  “Occupational Safety and Health in Construction Sector”.

The round table conference was presided over by Dr. Toufiq M. Seraj, Chairman, FPD and moderated by Kazi Anisuddin Iqbal, Executive Director, FPD. On the advent of the round table, Toufiq M. Seraj described the aims and objectives of FPD.

Continue reading 2nd Round Table Discussion: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN CONSTRUCTION SECTOR